More wild cards

Following up on my recent discussion of wild cards — i.e., low-probability but high-impact developments in the future — here are five wild cards discussed in brief reports by Social Technologies LLC:

Recorded Lives: Lifelogging, the use of information technology to comprehensively record and archive a person’s experiences, could become a mainstream practice, due to declining hardware costs and rising consumer interest. Life recording would build on the trends witnessed in current blog, online photo album, and video journal Web sites. (Brief GL-2007-50) Additional research here and here.

Bye-Bye Bees: Colony collapse disorder (CCD) — the disappearance of honeybees from commercial hives — is alarming but probably temporary, most experts say. But what if CCD isn’t temporary? The long-term loss of honeybees could be calamitous for agriculture and the downstream businesses that depend on it. (Brief GL-2007-43)

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Blog Watch: Roland Piquepaille’s Technology Trends

One of the many blogs I monitor is Roland Piquepaille’s Technology Trends. Here’s my review:

Mission: “How new technologies are modifying our way of life”

Author: Roland Piquepaille, a computer consultant based in Paris; partner in the Savoir-Faire & Cie network; specializes in high-performance computing and visualization.

Pros: Wide range of raw material (he must read a lot of publications!). Identifies sources. Adds context and related links. Good RSS feed. Provides images/photos.

Cons: None.

Comment: If you’re in a hurry, the first paragraph (which shows up in the RSS feed) tells you mostly what you need to know.

Examples of gems I found there:

RFID tags spy on bartenders: Capton, a provider of liquor-monitoring technology, has developed the Beverage Tracker system (being tested at the Treasure Island hotel-casino in Las Vegas) which uses RFID tags to determine whether bartenders are overpouring or undercharging. It can save $90,000/year for an average bar.

The first world map of happiness: Built at the University of Leicester, the map shows you’ll be happier if you live in Denmark (rated No.1) or Switzerland (No.2) than in Zimbabwe (No.177) or Burundi (No.178).

A robot that paints like Jackson Pollock: Computer scientists at the Washington University in Saint-Louis built a robot that makes drip paintings like Jackson Pollock’s — who was also known as “Jack the Dripper.” The robot, dubbed ‘Action Jackson,’ can finish an ‘artwork’ in just minutes, like Jackson Pollock probably did. But the paintings by this robot can be bought for about $10, far from the whopping $140 million price paid last year for “No.5, 1948.”